WAITOC Stories

  • WA Aboriginal Tourism Stars Shine Across The State

    WA Aboriginal Tourism Stars Shine Across The State

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    The Western Australian Indigenous Tourism Operators Council - WAITOC - and member businesses from around the State celebrated the Tourism Award wins for three unique Aboriginal Tourism experiences at three magical locations from the north to the south of WA.

          

    From left: Clinton Walker (Ngurrangga Tours), Jo Camilleri & Neville Poelina (Uptuyu), Jessica Priestly and Josh Whiteland (Koomal Dreaming) 

    Gold for Ngurrangga Tours - in the Pilbara 

              

    Gold for Clinton Walker & Family

    This first time entrant soared straight to gold!  Showcasing one of the world's most ancient landscapes - over 2.5 billion years old - where the Aboriginal people have lived for more than 40,000 years. Almost too excited for words, owner/operator, Clinton Walker said "I'm so proud to receive this award for my business, for my family, but above all for Aboriginal tourism in the Pilbara region - it casts a much-needed spotlight on these ancient landscapes which lie at the very heart of WA's outback - so rich in natural treasures and cultural diversity". Clinton's range of tour options include a visit to the world's largest open air art gallery -  the Murujuga National Park - which houses the highest concentration of rock art in the world, featuring around one million engravings across the entire Burrup Peninsula and Dampier Archipelago. Tour guests are treated to exclusive cultural insights, sacred sites and stories - created by the Yaburrara (Northern Ngarluma) people. These rock art sites have been dated back to the ice age. And your journey with Clinton will encompass some of the Pilbara's most beautiful, colourful landscapes.  Visit Ngurrangga Tours' website here

    In the Kimberley - Uptuyu Aboriginal Adventures Won their 6th State Tourism Award

                  

    Multi Award Winners - Neville Poelina and Jo Camilleri

    Uptuyu offer nature-based 4WD adventure tours to small groups, showcasing breathtaking locations and exclusive spots which are only accessible with a local custodian. Not 'just' a tour - this is a Bush Rendezvous through one of the world's last great wilderness frontiers, where you will discover traditional food and medicine as you explore the Aboriginal Kimberley and its history. Passionate about sharing cultural immersion at a remote and intimate setting without compromising the welfare of their guests, Uptuyu places special emphasis on the finer details, ensuring that safety and comfort thread the trail of every journey. And all along the way, your Uptuyu tour guide will offer flexible options - if there are places or topics of particular interest, they will be tagged into your own, specially tailored experience - it's UPTUYU!      Visit Uptuyu's website here

    In Margaret River - Koomal Dreaming joined the Hall of Fame

               

    Josh Whiteland and Jessica Priestly join the Hall of Fame

    Following three consecutive gold awards, Koomal Dreaming has now entered the WA Tourism Hall of Fame. Welcome to Country, Didgeridoo Music Performances, Cultural Awareness and Education Programmes and Cultural Tours - their product portfolio comprises a wide range of options - testifying the      many years of passion and hard work that Josh Whiteland and Jessica Priestly have invested in the organisation. Explore the Dreamtime story of Ngilgi Cave and experience a Didgeridoo performance - a live 'rock' concert. Fire making and traditional cooking are popular tour topics along with interactive opportunities to try your hand at foraging and gathering as you explore some of the South West coastal trails with Josh - immersing your senses in the culture and traditions of the Wadandi and Bibbulman people.  Visit Koomal Dreaming's website here  

  • What is the difference between a good tour guide - and a great tour guide?

    What is the difference between a good tour guide - and a great tour guide?

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    Taking a closer look at this year’s Golden Guide Award Winner - Brian Lee

    Today’s travellers have such individual perceptions of good and bad tour experiences, that - trying to define a list of ‘top tour guide’ characteristics leaves us paddling endless tides of ‘variables’. So let’s just focus on the highlights - the ‘glitter’ that catches our eyes as our journey with Brian unfurls. 

    Brian Lee’s Hunters Creek Tagalong Tour takes small groups of self-drive visitors on an explorative journey into the turquoise seascapes of Hunters Creek. The area is rich in stories of the history, culture and lifestyle of the local Bardi people, of the white settlers and a variety of natural treasures, flora and fauna.

    As we start the tour, our first impression is that we feel relaxed and comfortable with our guide, and we quickly recognise that we are not part of a ‘standard’ itinerary - we are special guests and our tour will be ‘styled’ in line with our individual aspirations. 

    One of Brian’s main agendas – which threads the events of our day – is to constantly interact and get to know his tour guests. But he is not doing this as ‘a routine part of the job’, his depth of engagement reflects a genuine interest in each and every one of the people on his tour - and his natural, non-invasive approach signifies a strong empathy.

              

    The main focus of this tour is to share knowledge, not just by pointing things out – it is largely portrayed through a selection of local stories - and to extend an opportunity to immerse in the local Bardi culture. As we venture through today’s journey, we are stopping here and there, discovering hidden treasures we would not have seen without our guide, and gaining a better understanding of his fascinating and uniquely rich perspective of the country. 

    Brian’s stories are beautifully crafted with a strong sense of passion and pride. The information is authentic – delivered first hand by a traditional custodian who has a deep, personal connection to his country and heritage. A guest described this very aptly “I have done Brian’s tours a few times now and love it more and more every time . . . his wealth of knowledge and cultural richness . . . he always has me walking away feeling uplifted and very privileged to have shared a small slice of his world”. 

    The number of (tagalong) vehicles is limited to 10, allowing for a maximum of 25 guests, to ensure an interactive, personalised experience. The tours commence at 8.30 am and return at approximately 2.30 pm - but this is often later, as Brian is an extremely engaging guide who is willing to invest additional time to elaborate on information and activities. 

    Another key highlight is the variety of ‘hands-on’ interaction opportunities. These can be flexibly tailored in line with our preferences. Guests are encouraged to try their hand at traditional hunting and fishing, discover the local flora and taste the ‘catch of the day’ – which usually includes mud crab, cooked in a traditional way on an open fire on the banks of the creek. An interactive tour leaves a much stronger footprint in our ‘take home’ stories and memories – as Benjamin Franklin once said “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn”.

                              

    And the landscape itself should not go amiss on our list of highlights. The area, abundant with natural attractions, portrays a powerful feeling of space and solitude – all richly coloured with turquoise waters, white sand and pindan cliffs. In the interest of environmental and cultural protection, Hunters Creek is closed to the general public. Brian operates his tours as a tagalong concept, ensuring that guests follow in his tracks, and that this pristine environment retains its unspoiled magic for many years to come. 

    Last but not least – a quote from Brian: “I am a Bardi man and this country has been home to my people for tens of thousands of years. We are proud saltwater people. It is my privilege to be able to share the stories of my people and our beautiful home with visitors from around the country and all over the world”.

                                                         

    The FACET Golden Guide Award  is presented annually by the Forum Advocating Cultural and Eco Tourism.
    Good interpretation is essential for successful tour guiding and ensuring the visitor is left with a memorable experience. FACET believes it is important to acknowledge those guides who are leading the way in offering visitors an authentic and enriching experience.

    In 1998 FACET’s deputy chair, Colin Ingram initiated the idea and FACET developed this into the FACET Golden Guide Award. Colin said, “ What inspired me with this idea, was seeing other industries recognise their staff at the coalface, whereas the tourism industry awards were mainly focused on the businesses. It appeared to me that the most important people where those that were delivering the tourism experience directly to the customer, and yet there was no formal recognition to reward those that were extraordinary”.

     

     

                          

  • Kambarang - Celebrating a Bounty of Bush Foods at Margaret River’s most Unique Gourmet Event

    Kambarang - Celebrating a Bounty of Bush Foods at Margaret River’s most Unique Gourmet Event

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    Sixteen Aboriginal hospitality students from WA’s Kimberley, Pilbara and South West regions travelled to this year’s Margaret River Gourmet Escape to join a series of Master classes. Working alongside the cooking stars; Mark Olive, Josh Whiteland and a range of other industry professionals, their ‘classroom’ was the Kambarang South West Aboriginal Gourmet Experience - for 100 guests! 

        

    The Kambarang gourmet experience showcases a creative fusion of contemporary and native bush flavours, with locally ‘foraged’ ingredients such as lemon myrtle beer battered reef fish served with quandong sea celery mayo dips. Foraging expeditions are part of the students' on country training activities during the lead up to the cooking tutorials. Josh Whiteland, who has inspired many great chefs at previous Gourmet Escapes with his knowledge of native foods, said “we collected grains, sea celery, saltbush and dune spinach and identified native medicine and food plants”.

    The ‘cutting edge’ of the week-long coaching is when the students – aged between 15 and 17 – are fast tracked into a real life restaurant situation where they prepare, plate and serve the five course gourmet menu. This exercise reflects the main aim of the Kambarang event which, alongside the staging of a uniquely different long table lunch, is to give indigenous students from remote communities an opportunity to gain first hand insights into what the hospitality industry is all about and to boost their confidence and self-esteem to do the job.

               

    This year’s celebrity guests included the famous Italian born chef Antonia Carluccio and one of Australia's leading Aboriginal performers, musicians and writers, Dr Richard Walley. Kambarang is one of the six seasons on the Aboriginal calendar - marking the transition between the flowering plants and the end of the rain, it is a bountiful time for local seafood such as crab and abalone. The lush menu of fresh culinary creations was served with some ‘shy' smiles, a pride and passion for country and a portion of heart-melting cuteness.

                                    

    Local Aboriginal art, artefacts and music decked the venue with ‘glitter and glam’ as the Merindas, whose music is influenced by Motown and the Sapphires, set the ‘soul train’ rolling.

               

    The Kambarang Aboriginal Gourmet Experience is staged in November, as part of the Margaret River Gourmet Escape. The event provides a unique opportunity for Hospitality High School students (Cert I & II) from remote communities throughout WA to gain hands-on experience creating European style gourmet cuisine, ‘flavoured’ with their own special touch. Proudly driven and supported by Mark Olive (the Black Olive), Josh Whiteland (Koomal Dreaming), Roelands Village, South West Institute of Technology, Prepare Produce Provide, Outback Academy, WAITOC (WA Indigenous Tourism Operators Council) and Moontide Management.

    Venue: The South West Institute of Technology Margaret River Campus

    Date:  The next Kambarang Experience will be staged in November 2016 - check our WAITOC events calendar here

  • WAITOC Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences in WA - Issue 10 - Roelands Village

    WAITOC Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences in WA - Issue 10 - Roelands Village

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    WAITOC announces Roelands Village as the final featured operator in a series of Aboriginal food and drink showcase experiences in WA

    Western Australia Indigenous Tourism Operators Council’s (WAITOC) Chairman, Robert Taylor is pleased to feature another member as part of the Aboriginal Gourmet Experience series for 2015. “One of WAITOC’s objectives is to increase the profile and number of experiences in Perth and the South West region of WA and Roelands Village is certainly developing to be one of the key destinations in the South West”.

    The final operator in this series is WAITOC Aboriginal tourism operator member, Roelands Village (formerly known as Roelands Mission). Around 500 Aboriginal children were taken to the Roelands Mission from the 1940s to the 1970s. Now some of those people are transforming Roelands Village into a place of social business, education and healing.In 2004, the Indigenous Land Corporation bought the property on behalf of Woolkabunning Kiaka Incorporated representing the former residents and its purpose is now to promote the overall development of the Community.

    Roelands Village is a pilot location for Australia under a joint venture between Woolkabunning Kiaka Inc and the Outback Academy for the establishment of the Outback Academy Roelands. A component of the Outback Academy Roelands is the RESPECT Hospitality and Business training for Aboriginal people. The program is undertaken with Ambassador for the Hospitality Program, Mr Mark Olive aka Black Olive, Australia’s only internationally acclaimed Aboriginal chef; Elders and local knowledge holders; and the training partner the South West Institute of Technology. The program was a pilot for 8-12 Aboriginal people in 2013 for accredited hospitality and business training. The program includes one of Australia’s most successful Indigenous led healing programs, Red Dust Healing alongside employability skills training. RESPECT and community and school based programs also encourage healthy eating, cultural strengthening through increased knowledge about bush foods, and cooking skills/programs.

    Roelands Village aims to showcase the unique environment of the region as well as continue to build on what Roelands Village produces as a working farm, including farming native bush foods.

    Mr Les Wallam, Executive Officer, Woolkabunning Kiaka Inc (Roelands Village) said that "the community is excited with the plans in expanding in the tourism sector. We currently cater for the MICE market in that we provide conference and catering facilities and are currently in the planning stages of incorporating cultural tours and a café with the view of training our people in the tourism and hospitality field. "

    Speaking of Roelands Village, Simon Haigh, CEO of WAITOC said, "WAITOC's Aboriginal Gourmet Experience campaign is intended to highlight the unique food, drink and culture experiences that Aboriginal tourism operators have to offer in WA. In recent times, we have seen the growing importance of culinary tourism as a way to immerse yourself in the culture of the destination that you're visiting. Roelands Village being in a key food and wine destination in the South West is perfectly placed with the key attributes People, Produce and Place behind Tourism Australia's Restaurant Australia campaign providing a memorable experience for the tourists.


    Media Contact
    WAITOC CEO  
    +61 (0)419 921 946

    Mr Les Wallam
    Roelands Village (WKI)
    +61 (0)427 689 200

    03 Jul. 2015 

  • Funding to bring Yaburgurt public art to life

    Funding to bring Yaburgurt public art to life

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    FUNDING TO BRING YABURGURT PUBLIC ART TO LIFE
    Public artwork commemorating the life and times of Aboriginal leader Yaburgurt will soon be realised thanks to a significant grant from the State Government’s Royalties for Regions Regional Grants Scheme.
    The City of Mandurah was recently awarded a grant of $190,000 to create a public artwork of Yaburgurt (George Winjan) who was a significant elder in the Aboriginal community.
    Yaburgurt was a Bibbulmum Noongar leader of the Bindjareb Boodja during the early European settlement of Mandurah and the surrounding area.
    The artwork, to be installed in Mandjar Square, will bring to life Yaburgurt’s character, essence and legacy to commemorate the 100th year anniversary of his death in 2015.
    With the exact type of public art yet to be determined, the artwork will reflect and celebrate Yaburgurt’s life, as well as highlighting Mandurah’s Aboriginal characteristics. It will also use materials that either reference the Aboriginal community or were used by the community.
    The public artwork is part of the City’s Reconciliation Action Plan 2012-2014 and the Arts, Heritage and Culture Strategy, both of which seek to create an inclusive wider community with strong relationships across cultures based on mutual respect and understanding.
    The City of Mandurah is leading this project through the creation of the Yaburgurt Reference Group, which includes a number of organisations and individuals within the Aboriginal and broader community.
    The project also responds to requests from Reference Group member Koolbardies Talking Group, and Aboriginal Elders.
    The Yaburgurt public art project will help the City to work collaboratively with the Aboriginal community and local artists to showcase aspects of an ancient culture, and through the legacy of Yaburgurt, work towards addressing social issues.
    Mayor Marina Vergone said the City was very excited to have received the Royalties for Regions funding to bring this significant project to life.
    “This artwork will be such an important addition to the Mandurah community and will add to the diversity of public art in our city,” she said.
    “In working with the chosen artist, the City will celebrate, nurture and respect Aboriginal culture and history of the Bindjareb people through the creation of this art piece.
    “It’s hoped this project will encourage residents and visitors alike to connect with Mandurah’s diverse history and heritage.”
    George Walley, Chairperson of the Yaburgurt Reference Group, said that the investment in the project shows “respect and great appreciation of Mandurah’s history and is an amazing opportunity to celebrate Yaburgurt’s life journey, his passing and legacy”.
    It’s expected an artist will be appointed in August, and the artwork will be installed in mid-2016.
    The Peel Regional Grants Scheme is administered by the Peel Development Commission.
    Chairman of the Peel Development Commission, Paul Fitzpatrick said “the Commission is honoured to be able to make a contribution to such an important public project that recognises the legacy of one of our most significant Aboriginal elders. The creation of a number of significant Aboriginal artworks will foster greater social and cultural awareness of the traditional owners of our region.”
    The City is also commemorating the 100th anniversary of Yaburgurt’s death through a series of events and programs to be held this year, including the Yaburgurt Memorial Project which took place in March.
    Yaburgurt Background
    Yaburgurt, who took the name George Winjan, is a significant figure in the Aboriginal community, representing a time of major change in Australia’s history and becoming a symbol of reconciliation.
    The son of Winjan was a Tondarup (kinship name) and belonged to the Ocean Totem; he was born in Mandurah at a campsite near the old traffic bridge the Aboriginal people called Koolin-yinap (now Halls Head).
    He was born in 1824, prior to British settling the Swan Coastal Plain in 1829. Yaburgurt lived around Mandurah and the district for all of his life until his death around 1915. He is buried in the grounds of the Anglican Church, Christ’s Church, located in Mandurah.
    He was an important Elder and his camp site is located in Halls Head with various commemorative plaques and artworks that reference the area as a key Aboriginal site.
    Media Contact: Holly Sutton and Kellie Revett, Media and Public Relations Consultant on 9550 3727 or media@mandurah.wa.gov.au.
    26 June 2015
  • Introducing Artists in the Black education animations

    Introducing Artists in the Black education animations

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    Artists in the Black is proud to launch a new series of short animations, designed to educate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists about their rights.  Covering issues like Copyright, Contracts and Wills, the series features artworks by renowned Indigenous artists, brought to life by animation.

    By releasing this series, Artists in the Black hopes to engage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander arts communities in an ongoing conversation about legal rights and responsibilities, so that artists are empowered to carry out their practice in a non-exploitative and culturally aware environment.

    We are calling on you to spread the word far and wide, so take a look at the clips below, or on our youtube channel and please tweet and share via your social media!

     

     

  • WAITOC Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences in WA - Issue 9 - Bindi Bindi Dreaming

    WAITOC Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences in WA - Issue 9 - Bindi Bindi Dreaming

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    WAITOC ANNOUNCES BINDI BINDI DREAMING AS THE NINTH FEATURED OPERATOR IN A SERIES OF ABORIGINAL FOOD AND WINE EXPERIENCES IN WA.

    Western Australia Indigenous Tourism Operators Council’s (WAITOC) Chairman, Robert Taylor is pleased to feature another member as part of the Aboriginal Gourmet Experience series for 2015. “One of WAITOC’s objectives is to increase the profile and number of experiences in Perth and the South West region of WA and Bindi Bindi Dreaming is certainly one of the leading lights in our city”.

    Number nine in this series is WAITOC Aboriginal tourism operator member, Bindi Bindi Dreaming. Bindi Bindi Dreaming was first established due to the high demand of people from all walks of life wanting to know and understand Aboriginal culture. From listening to a simple dreaming story sitting in the bush to a yearning of tasting some bush tucker is just a few experiences. That’s when the idea of creating some walks, talks and cultural experiences were developed to suit everyone’s needs.

    Bindi Bindi Dreaming aims to showcase unique Aboriginal culture of Perth, Western Australia. Bindi Bindi Dreaming will allow visitors to gain a better understanding about its traditional people whom are local to the Perth/Metropolitan area and share their continuation of cultural traditions. Marissa aims to do this by raising people’s awareness of Noongar culture in Perth, Western Australia. The business aims to provide a 100% Aboriginal owned and operated cultural experience which will be most memorable for anyone to further share this with their families and friends.

    Marissa Verma, owner of Bindi Bindi Dreaming said that "Bindi Bindi means Butterfly in the local Noongar language. I’m about showcasing our unique culture of Perth in Western Australia which is the gateway to regional Western Australia and highlight that our culture is strong in our city and large urban centres. One of the favourite tours I offer is the Bush Tucker Tour where guests learn about the Noongar six seasons and how the bush was our supermarket and how we still use many of the plants and fruits today. They get to have a taste of these amazing flavours such as Lemon Myrtle Cake and Wattleseed damper with ‘roo’ curry and the feedback has been phenomenal."

    Bindi Bindi Dreaming is an Aboriginal family owned and operated business. The sorts of skills that exist within the enterprise are didge and dance, cultural tour guiding, catering with bush flavours and knowledge of Noongar Country and its people.

    Speaking of Bindi Bindi Dreaming, Simon Haigh, CEO of WAITOC said, "WAITOC's Aboriginal Gourmet Experience campaign is intended to highlight the unique food, drink and culture experiences that Aboriginal tourism operators have to offer in WA. In recent times, we have seen the growing importance of culinary tourism as a way to immerse yourself in the culture of the destination that you're visiting. The key attributes People, Produce and Place behind Tourism Australia's Restaurant Australia campaign provides a memorable experience for the tourists. Culinary tourism is a great way to exchange culture and is growing in popularity. The tours that Marissa provides through Bindi Bindi Dreaming is a shining example of that.


    Media Contact
    CEO WAITOC
    +61 (0)419 921 946

    Ms Marissa Verma
    Bindi Bindi Dreaming
    +61 (0)417 031 707


  • International Aboriginal Tourism Conference in Quebec Canada

    International Aboriginal Tourism Conference in Quebec Canada

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    Nearly 350 aboriginal tourism industry key players and partners, half of whom came from abroad, were gathered in Fairmont Le ChâteauFrontenacfor the first International Aboriginal Tourism Conference (IATC) held in Quebec on March 24-25 to discuss the global aboriginal tourism industry and reward the province’s aboriginal tourism enterprises

    Under the honorary presidency of AFNQL Chief Ghislain Picard, the two-day conference addressed themes such as commitment, authenticity, preferred destinations, marketing, best practices in tourism and more. Forty top speakers and global leaders from the aboriginal tourism industry took part in this major event. During the grand opening ceremony,Quebec’sMinister of Tourism,Dominique Viencongratulated Quebec Aboriginal Tourism (QAT) for the leadership demonstrated in organizing this international conference. QAT President, Steeve Wadohandik Gros-Louis, indicated a lot of satisfaction as regards the wider scope taken by this major event and its impact on the association and on the global aboriginal tourism industry.

    The high level of participation exceeded all our objectives in terms of exchange with our peers from other provinces and countries, and added to our pride in welcoming on our lands these delegates and strategic players from the world over, all gathered for the emergence and development of aboriginal tourism enterprises around the world.  Tiawenhk, our thanks to all participants and organizations who accepted our invitation,“said Steeve Wadohandik Gros-Louis.

    WAITOC was well represented with both the Chair and CEO presenting to the audience on key topics such as destination development and the importance of developing and sustaining long term partnerships. WAITOC Chair Robert Taylor said “the conference confirmed that although lagging slightly behind destinations such as Canada, Australia and more specifically Western Australia is starting to make significant inroads in developing our Aboriginal Tourism sector.”

    WAITOC CEO Simon Haigh confirmed the strategy adopted by WAITOC is the right way to move forward. “The conference in Canada was a success and we certainly would like to acknowledge Quebec Aboriginal Tourism as a very welcoming host and leadership in the development of this conference. The presentations from a diverse range of countries confirmed that we are driving Aboriginal tourism in this State in the right direction and that the recent Corporate Strategy released by WAITOC will be underpinning the 4 year Aboriginal tourism development program to be announced soon.”

  • Swan Valley welcomes the opening of a new Aboriginal Art Gallery

    Swan Valley welcomes the opening of a new Aboriginal Art Gallery

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    Fiona Reidy – Djinda Kaal is a Noongar woman of the Bal-ar-dong clan traditionally located in the York and Brookton areas, in the wheat-belt region of Western Australia. Her inspiration to paint developed over time observing the different styles and talents of her family.

    Fiona’s art is a rhythmic combination of colours and earthy tones. Her technique shows the ability to layer and blend which gives my dot work a kinetic and unique contemporary and sometimes 3 dimensional style.

    Djinda Kaal is Fiona’s artist name in Noongar meaning 'Star Fire' which her mother chose for her. What inspires Fiona to paint is having a strong connection to country, family and most of all how her ancestors who were hunters and gatherers lived off the land as nomadic people.
    The depictions in her artwork visually enhances the individual’s senses to connect to her culture, land and the animals.

    Fiona is the Proprietor and Artist in Residence of the new Aboriginal Art Gallery in the beautiful Swan Valley. Djinda Kaal Aboriginal Art Gallery is located on 24 Coast Road, West Swan where Fiona displays her beautiful art works and showcases her talent. Click here for more information.

  • WAITOC Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences in WA - Issue 8 - Goombaragin Eco Retreat

    WAITOC Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences in WA - Issue 8 - Goombaragin Eco Retreat

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    WAITOC announces Goombaragin Eco Retreat as the eighth featured operator in a series of Aboriginal food and drink showcase experiences in WA

    Western Australia Indigenous Tourism Operators Council’s (WAITOC) Chairman, Robert Taylor is pleased to feature another member as part of the Aboriginal Gourmet Experience series for 2014 in line with the recent launch of Restaurant Australia by Tourism Australia inviting the world to dinner.

    Over the course of 2014 WAITOC has been showcasing Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences across Australia, from food and produce, seafood, food events, cafes and restaurants.

    Number eight in this series is WAITOC Aboriginal tourism operator member, Goombaragin Eco Retreat.   Tucked away on the gorgeous West Australian coastline in the Kimberley you will find Goombaragin Eco Retreat. Owners of the retreat Kathleen Cox and John McLennan live on their property and operate their small exclusive family business offering a variety of self-contained accommodations to camping sites all well positioned to maximised gorgeous coastal views.

    The environmentally friendly coastal getaway has been developed to keep in-line with their eco philosophy about minimising impact on country, managing waste and ensuring every business step taken underpins the symbiotic relationships of the land and sea and the seasons around them.

    Goombaragin Eco Retreat is known for its beautiful beaches, spectacular sunrises and sunsets, great swimming, snorkelling and fishing spots to enjoying some of the Dampier Peninsula's magnificent coastline.  Enjoy nibbles and drinks out on Aalin’s Lookout and spot turtles, dolphins, manta rays, dugongs and humpback whales as they migrate north with their calves to warmer waters.  Fossick at low tide and enjoy the beauty of the dynamic marine eco reef systems with gorgeous colourful corals, rock pools and a large variety of marine life to star gazing at night and much more.

    Many guests from all around the world and Australia visit the exclusive retreat every year and numbers are increasing annually.  The private accommodation at Goombaragin provides a romantic escape for couples seeking that special getaway destination.

    The school holidays brings many families and children to Goombaragin so there are lots of activities to join in and be part of a hands on experience with John, Kathleen and their family such as beach walks, swimming, fishing, snorkelling, educational reef walks, learning about the local flora and fauna to sharing stories around the campfire and much more including making clapping sticks and hair pins from local bush wood in the area collected on the day.  A popular activity enjoyed by all!  The retreat has developed their own vegetables garden which compliments the delicious native bush foods that are available in the region. Many guests take delight in picking the local bush fruits, catching and cooking their catch of the day to collecting fresh produce from the veggie garden to enjoy with their meals.  This special experience makes them feel part of the family and an inclusive getaway experience with a difference.

    Dampier Peninsula and Cape Leveque offer the perfect getaway for the adventurous traveller. Stretching 220 kilometres north from Broome, the only access to the area is via the partially unsealed Cape Leveque Road.

    Speaking of Goombaragin Eco Retreat, Simon Haigh, CEO of WAITOC said, "WAITOC's Aboriginal Gourmet Experience campaign is intended to highlight the unique food, drink and culture experiences that Aboriginal tourism operators have to offer in WA.  In recent times, we have seen the growing importance of culinary tourism as a way to immerse yourself in the culture of the destination that you're visiting.  The key attributes People, Produce and Place behind Tourism Australia's Restaurant Australia campaign provides a memorable experience for the tourists.  Culinary tourism is a great way to exchange culture and is growing in popularity.  Kathleen Cox and John McLennan are a great example of an Aboriginal Gourmet Experience, using 'fresh' and local flavours to be experienced in WA’s unique destination of the Dampier Peninsula.” 

    Media Contact 
    CEO WAITOC 
    +61 (0)419 921 946

    Ms Kathleen Cox - +61 (0)429 505 347

    Mr John McLennan - +61 (0)499 330 508

    Goombaragin Eco Retreat

  • WAITOC Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences in WA - Issue 7 - Maalinup Aboriginal Gallery

    WAITOC Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences in WA - Issue 7 - Maalinup Aboriginal Gallery

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    WAITOC announces Maalinup Aboriginal Gallery as the seventh featured operator in a series of Aboriginal food and drink showcase experiences in WA

    Western Australia Indigenous Tourism Operators Council’s (WAITOC) Chairman, Robert Taylor is pleased to feature another member as part of the Aboriginal Gourmet Experience series for 2014 in line with the recent launch of Restaurant Australia by Tourism Australia inviting the world to dinner.

    Over the course of 2014 WAITOC has been showcasing Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences across Australia, from food and produce, seafood, food events, cafes and restaurants.

    Number seven in this series is WAITOC Aboriginal tourism operator member, Maalinup Aboriginal Gallery.   Unique to Perth, Maalinup Aboriginal Gallery is an Aboriginal owned and operated enterprise offering cultural activities, talks, performances and bush tucker as well as beautiful artwork by local Aboriginal artists. Our gorgeous hand painted glass and wood ware make perfect gifts and souvenirs. Maalinup also offers napery, scarves and T Shirts featuring Aboriginal designs, and a range of Australiana souvenirs. Owners Dale and Lyall make soap, skincare, returning boomerangs and artefacts for the gallery. Drop in daily 10 am to 5 pm to taste sauces, jams, chutneys, relishes, dukkahs and more from our Bush Tucker range and find those rare Australian native herbs, spices and peppers.

    Owner of Maalinup Aboriginal Gallery, Dale Tilbrook said “you don’t have to venture far when arriving in Perth to experience bush tucker. We offer Bush Tucker Talks and Tastings: learn about how we travelled across the land according to our six seasons and Aboriginal unique knowledge that allowed us to meet in large numbers for ceremony, accessing the abundant food sources available in different areas at different times; discover how the biodiversity of the South West provided a huge array of food and how Aboriginal people “farmed” the land; try some mereny (vegetable food) and finish off with some delectable goodies.

    Maalinup Aboriginal Gallery is renowned for delicious bush tucker cakes, jams tarts and savouries prepared for special occasions.  We are happy to cater for your next event.  We also partner with the Swan Valley Oasis Resort to present Kedalak Kening (nightime corroboree) for groups, an evening of Aboriginal dance, storytelling and bush tucker.

    The Swan Valley region of Perth, Western Australia is built on a unique history and heritage blending Aboriginal, pioneering colonial and southern European roots.

    Speaking of Maalinup Aboriginal Gallery, Simon Haigh, CEO of WAITOC said, "WAITOC's Aboriginal Gourmet Experience campaign is intended to highlight the unique food, drink and culture experiences that Aboriginal tourism operators have to offer in WA.  In recent times, we have seen the growing importance of culinary tourism as a way to immerse yourself in the culture of the destination that you're visiting.  The key attributes People, Produce and Place behind Tourism Australia's Restaurant Australia campaign provides a memorable experience for the tourists.  Culinary tourism is a great way to exchange culture and is growing in popularity.  Dale Tilbrook is a great example of an Aboriginal Gourmet Experience, using 'fresh' and local flavours to be experienced in WA’s oldest wine growing regions in Australia, the Swan Valley providing an urban experience to those that visit Perth as a destination." 

    Media Contact  
    CEO WAITOC 
    +61 (0)419 921 946

    Ms Dale Tilbrook
    Maalinup Aboriginal Gallery
    +61 (0)411 112 450

  • New Company Jatu Clothing meeting your corporate needs

    New Company Jatu Clothing meeting your corporate needs

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    WAITOC Association Member - Jatu Clothing & PPE is a newly formed Pilbara Aboriginal family business.  The owners immediate family connections belong with the Nyangumarta people whose traditional homelands are in the northern Pilbara region of Western Australia.


    Jatu (pronounced Jar-tu) is a Nyangumarta word for eagle.


    At Jatu Clothing & PPE we understand the need for Aboriginal economic independence and professional and ethical business practice.

    One stop shop for all your hospitality needs

    Jatu Clothing carry a range of apparel including, hospitality gear, corporate uniforms, PPE clothing and accessories. We also source a wide range of promotional items and corporate gifts. If you need a core or specialised product and you can’t find it in our online store, we will do our best to promptly source it for you and add it to your customized ordering portal.

    Aboriginal Owned and Operated – Jatu Clothing is proud to be a 100% owned and incorporated Australian Aboriginal Company

    Contact Jatu Clothing now to discuss your future corporate branding needs.

  • Magabala Books Book Release - Alfies Search for Destiny

    Magabala Books Book Release - Alfies Search for Destiny

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    Magabala Books is proud to Introduce David Hardy's beautifully illustrated new picture book, Alfie's Big Wish.  David Hardy is an Indigenous artist with more than eight years of animation experience with Walt Disney Animation Studios.  Continuing the playful, lyrical style of Alfie’s Search for Destiny, Alfie’s Big Wish is bound to become a childhood favourite!  The book is aimed at readers 5 – 8 years old.

    We have 2 FREE copies to give away to our readers of the new book together with the first book Alfie’s Search for Destiny.  To enter please send your name, address and contact details to WAITOC. 

    In Alfie's Big Wish  we join a young boy, Alfie, on a quest for companionship. When at first his friends leave with their parents, Alfie searches high and low for somebody new to play with. There are other kids but they are much older and bigger, and the various animals he encounters all have companions of their own. Sad and lonely at the end of the day, Alfie makes a big wish. When he wakes up, he finds out that sometimes wishes really do come true! 

    The Author / Illustrator

    David Hardy is a descendant of the Barkindji people of Brewarrina, north west of NSW. For many years he worked in feature film animation with Walt Disney Animation Studios. David now lives in Sydney with his wife and two children and is an accomplished freelance illustrator, specialising in character design, portraits and caricatures. After becoming a father, David realised how lost and disoriented children can become throughout their growing years. He believes that there is nothing more important than family. Alfie’s Big Wish follows the success of Alfie’s Search for Destiny published in 2013.

    To purchase or find out more information contact Magabala Books
  • WAITOC is proud to support the first ever Kambarang event in the South West

    WAITOC is proud to support the first ever Kambarang event in the South West

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    Introducing a feast of bush flavours with contemporary international cuisine to tempt your senses with internationally renowned Aboriginal Chef Mark Olive aka ‘The Black Olive’ and Josh Whiteland from award winning local South West business Koomal Dreaming.

    This is the first event in the South West where people can enjoy a culinary feast of native bush foods.  Supported by Aboriginal hospitality students from various High Schools as well as the Outback Academy apprentices and students, you’ll have a cultural culinary experience surrounded by the Noongar Art Exhibition as well as the music from Gina Williams and Guy Ghouse who are able to capture the hearts and imagination of an audience through song.

    We will be taking you on a journey that you won’t get anywhere else and will leave you with an experience you are not likely to forget.

    The event is preceded by a series of Masterclasses which the Aboriginal students will undertake prior to the event.  The Masterclasses will be held at Roelands Village with a number of mentors and industry leaders within the hospitality and tourism industry, supporting and inspiring Aboriginal youth to consider and develop a career path within these sectors.  This event is the first of its kind and will set a precedent for future Masterclasses and events.

    This event is proudly brought to you by Outback Academy, Roelands Village, WA Indigenous Tourism Operators Council, South West Institute of Technology, Black Olive and Koomal Dreaming.

    All proceeds will go towards the Outback Academy Hospitality Program – encouraging Aboriginal people to consider a career in hospitality, tourism and events.

    For more information and bookings click here.
  • WAITOC welcomes new member Scribblebark Design

    WAITOC welcomes new member Scribblebark Design

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    Scribblebark Design is Deborah Bonar’s home art studio in Ballajura. Her Aboriginal heritage is Gija and Yamatji. Come see the artist at work and view the range of artwork for sale. She specialises in vibrant acrylic abstracts but also paints with ochres. In addition to her original artworks, there is a range of limited edition, framed prints for sale. 

    As this is a small home studio, capacity is limited. Visits are by appointment only.  

    Individuals can also book a workshop where Deborah will give a talk about Aboriginal art and the complexity of her own art practice, followed by a painting workshop where participants can complete a small painting. 

    For  more information and workshop bookings click here

  • WAITOC Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences in WA - Issue 6 - Brian Lee Hunters Creek Tagalong Tours

    WAITOC Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences in WA - Issue 6 - Brian Lee Hunters Creek Tagalong Tours

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    WAITOC announces Brian Lee Hunters Creek Tagalong Tours as the sixth featured operator in a series of Aboriginal food and drink showcase experiences in WA

    Western Australia Indigenous Tourism Operators Council’s (WAITOC) Chairman, Doc Reynolds is pleased to feature another member as part of the Aboriginal Gourmet Experience series for 2014 in line with the recent launch of Restaurant Australia by Tourism Australia inviting the world to dinner.

    Over the course of 2014,  WAITOC will showcase ten Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences across Australia, from food and produce, seafood, food events, cafes and restaurants.

    Number six in this ten month series is WAITOC Aboriginal tourism operator member, Brian Lee Hunters Creek Tagalong Tours.  As one of the areas Traditional Owners, Brian Lee offers visitors a unique insight into the traditional ways of the Bardi people and delivers a Kimberley experience that you will never forget. One of the Kimberley's most colourful characters, Brian takes visitors on an amazing adventure based around the turquoise waters of Hunters Creek north on the Dampier Peninsula, Kimberley.   Guests can taste seasonal bush fruit and hear the ancient stories of a people who once walked this timeless landscape. 

    Owner of Hunters Creek Tagalong Tours, Brian said “we’ve got a fascinating history here which I share with everyone that comes with me on tour.  We go down to the banks of Hunters Creek and that’s where the fun really starts.  I teach the traditional fishing and crabbing methods and the tour concludes under a shady tree, where you cook up your catch – Bardi style on an open fire.”

    Speaking of Brian Lee Hunters Creek Tagalong Tours, Simon Haigh, CEO of WAITOC said, "WAITOC's Aboriginal Gourmet Experience campaign is intended to highlight the unique food, drink and culture experiences that Aboriginal tourism operators have to offer in WA.  In recent times, we have seen the growing importance of culinary tourism as a way to immerse yourself in the culture of the destination that you're visiting.  The key attributes People, Produce and Place behind Tourism Australia's Restaurant Australia campaign provides a memorable experience for the tourists.  Culinary tourism is a great way to exchange culture and is growing in popularity.  Brian Lee is a great example of an Aboriginal Gourmet Experience, using 'fresh' and local flavours to be experienced in one of the world's top destination for international visitors and has been featured extensively through the Restaurant Australia campaign promoting Cape Leveque as a destination." 

    Media Contact 
    Mr Simon Haigh 
    CEO WAITOC 
    +61 (0)419 921 946

    Mr Brian Lee
    Hunters Creek Tagalong Tours
    +61 (0)437 026 262

  • Aboriginal elders in the Kimberley capitalise on the booming cruise ship industry

    Aboriginal elders in the Kimberley capitalise on the booming cruise ship industry

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    By Erin Parke                       

    PHOTO:  Tour guide Robyn Mungaloo shows tourists rock art in the Kimberley.

    MAP:  Derby 6728

    In a remote corner of the Kimberley, Aboriginal elders have hit on a way to keep their culture alive and their rock art safe.

    They are capitalising on the booming cruise ship industry, to create jobs and income on a stretch of coastline accessible only by boat or plane.

    Freshwater Cove lies 200 kilometres north-east of Derby.

    Its vast white beaches, red rock formations and ancient cave paintings are the stuff of tourism advertisements broadcast around the world.

    The cove lies on Worrorra country. Senior custodian Donny Woolagoodja says his people's connection to the land remains strong, despite most of them now living in Derby and Mowanjum.

    We used to paint on the cave walls, now we paint in acrylic, on canvas. It feels good.

    Robyn Mungaloo

    "I love this country, it's a gift to us. It's something that we belong to that country," he said.

    For years, Mr Woolagoodja's wanted to get Worrorra young people back on to country. In 2009, cultural tourism became a way to do that.

    He teamed up with businessman and conservationist Pete Tucker, who for years had been running a fishing camp at Freshwater Cove.

    "The idea was that we wanted to get young kids up here to live on country and work and earn some money, and cultural tourism became a way to do that," Mr Tucker said.

    Tapping in to cruise ships

    However, getting tourists to such a remote spot was always going to be difficult, so they decided to tap into the flourishing cruise ship market.

    "The number of cruise ships travelling the Kimberley coast has exploded in recent years," he said.

    "These cruise boats do about 1,000 kilometres of the Kimberley coastline and this is the only place they actually get to meet traditional owners."

    Wandjina Tours now hosts more than 2,000 cruise ship passengers a year; interstate and overseas visitors who are hungry for the kind of authentic Indigenous experience that cannot be recreated in a tourist shop in Broome or Sydney.

    Robyn Mungulu is one of the tour guides that greets the guests and takes them on a guided tour of the cove.

    "We teach them about culture, take them to cave sites, sacred areas and tell them stories about the areas," she said.

    During quiet times she paints artwork on the beach, paintings that are sold direct to the tourists without city galleries taking a cut of the profits.

    "We used to paint on the cave walls, now we paint in acrylic, on canvas. It feels good," she said.

    Ms Mungulu said the business has given her a reason to learn Worrorra language, the stories of the Wandjina rock art and spend time on the rugged coastline where her ancestors lived for thousands of years.

    "Working back on country is really good, because you learn a lot more than when you're living in town," she said.

    "Out here, it's better living than what you get in town, because this is fresh air and you're surrounded by nature.

    "You feel really heavy when you're leaving, and when you come back you sort of feel really light and happy to be back on country."

    Gaining control of tourism

    For Pete Tucker, the benefits of remote, on-country tourism are multiple.

    He said it is not so much about making money, as empowering traditional owners to know and inhabit their country.

    "We now have tourism en masse on the coast, and it puts a lot of pressure on not just the local environment, but very much so on cultural sensitive areas," he said.

    "This is where Wandjina Tours plays a good role, in that they can have some control over what places [people] are visiting and the numbers that visit."

    For Donny Woolagoodja it has been hard work to get the business to where it is now.

    But he says he could not be happier to see Worrorra young people showcasing their culture and country to curious tourists.

    "The younger generation like talking to people, they love it. It's given them something to be proud of for themselves, because they're doing something good," he said.

    "We're learning our younger generation, and we're also learning non-Aborigines something, and it feels good. It's something our older generation never does.

    "A lot of non-Aboriginal people don't know much about Aboriginal culture, they just look at it and don't know much about it. We need to teach them some more."

  • New Wadjuk Map outlining the Aboriginal connection before white settlers in 1829

    New Wadjuk Map outlining the Aboriginal connection before white settlers in 1829

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    Launching the Karla Yarning: Stories of the home fires initiative City of Perth Lord Mayor Lisa Scaffidi said the Aboriginal heritage maps allow people to discover the connection Aboriginal people have with the city.

    "The maps take people on a journey to discover and learn the importance Aboriginal heritage holds in the history of our city.

    “The first map, This city is Wadjuk country, explores Wadjuk Noongar history before the arrival of white settlers in 1829.

    “On your walk you will explore areas of importance before white settlement and get a feel for the way Wadjuk people lived, traded, hunted, harvested and conducted ceremonies,” Ms Scaffidi said.

    The second Karla Yarning map, Fighting for families, country, rights and recognition, explores Aboriginal history in Perth after 1829.

    On this walk, you learn about important events and developments including the resistance of Wadjuk leaders Midgegooroo and his son Yagan in the 1830s, the Prohibited Area zone in place between 1927-1954, Aboriginal protest rallies held in the 1930s and 1940s and the establishment of important Aboriginal organisations.

    The walks take approximately 1.5 hours each.

    The maps were initiated, researched and written by Professor Len Collard of UWA and Dr Tod Jones of Curtin University with input and advice from Cultural Advisors.

    The City would also like to acknowledge the project partners: Lotterywest, The Department of Aboriginal Affairs and Curtin University.

    Visitors can pick up a map from three locations: the WA Visitors Centre, iCity Kiosk in the Murray Street Mall, and Council House or download the maps from Karla Yarning: Stories of the home fires

  • Exciting new talent Fiona Reidy to hold her first exhibition in the Swan Valley

    Exciting new talent Fiona Reidy to hold her first exhibition in the Swan Valley

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    Fiona Reidy's first art exhibition will be launched Saturday 12 July 2014 from 2 - 6.30pm at the Yonga Boodjah Aboriginal Art Gallery located at 6571 West Swan Road, West Swan.

    The Yonga Boodjah Aboriginal Art Gallery is 100% Noongar owned and was established in August 2013.

    The gallery features the works of acclaimed artists/owners Phil Narkle, Dennis Kicket (Noongali), Deborah Newenham - Coertse and exciting new talent Fiona Reidy.  Four artists with four different styles in a stunning 180sqm gallery.

    Products offered include original art, limited editions, prints, matted prints, bark paintings, ceramics, candles, jewellery boxes, message stones, message sticks, clapsticks, didgeridoos, t-towels, emu eggs, stationery, postcards, bookmarks, keyrings, fridge magnets, earrings and bangles.

    LOOK NO FURTHER FOR GIFTS TO MARK THAT SPECIAL OCCASION.

    Visit the Gallery while spending a day in the beautiful Swan Valley.  For more information click here.


  • Urban Indigenous taking it to the next level!

    Urban Indigenous taking it to the next level!

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    …from little things…BIG things grow

    and their gorgeous new website goes live

    www.urbanindigenous.com.au                  

    Urban Indigenous

    A little name change, a gorgeous new website, sparkling new wheels, a full time Aboriginal Trainee in Ada Ashwin, and a CEO in AFL Legend & Aboriginal Role Model Troy Cook.

    Urban Indigenous (previously Urban Indigenous Tours) has met with nothing short of small business magic.  Business founder Rebecca Casey has met with a few, equally passionate people who have Reconciliation Australia close to their hearts and Aboriginal Tourism a priority.

    These new steps, subtle and significant, are just the lead in to a shape up in Aboriginal Tourism Australia.  For more information contact Rebecca Casey on 0403 529 473 or click here for more information.

  • Bush Babies Exhibition coming to Perth

    Bush Babies Exhibition coming to Perth

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    The strength and resilience of Noongar Elders from across the Wheatbelt will be celebrated in two exhibitions in the Perth Cultural Centre during NAIDOC Week.

    The Bush Babies Honouring Our Elders Portrait exhibition will be showcased at the WA Museum and the State Library of WA from Sunday 6 July. 

    The 16 Elders who have been immortalised on canvas are part of CAN WA’s Bush Babies community arts project, which aims to capture the unique stories of the Noongar babies who were born in the bush, reserves, missions or fringes of towns.

    At the heart of this exhibition is Hazel Winmar, who is believed to be the oldest Noongar person alive.  Affectionately known as 'Nana Purple' she will celebrate her 100th birthday the week before the exhibition opens. 

    Artist Graham Smith inspired the Elders portrait project when he saw a Bush Babies photo of Hazel Winmar and felt compelled to paint her. 

    The exhibition features 18 portrait paintings and 14 portrait photographs of Noongar elders from Narrogin, Katanning, Kellerberrin and Quairading.

    The exhibition was featured on the State 7.30 Report.

    You can view the story here:

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-06-13/was-oldest-known-living-noongar-elder-celebrates-a/5523610

  • WAITOC Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences in WA - Issue 5 - Barraddict Sport Fishing Charter

    WAITOC Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences in WA - Issue 5 - Barraddict Sport Fishing Charter

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    WAITOC announces Barraddict Fishing Charters as the fifth featured operator in a series of Aboriginal food and drink showcase experiences in WA 

    Western Australia Indigenous Tourism Operators Council’s (WAITOC) Chairman, Doc Reynolds is pleased to feature another member as part of the Aboriginal Gourmet Experience series for 2014 in line with the recent launch of Restaurant Australia by Tourism Australia inviting the world to dinner.

    Over the course of 2014, WAITOC will showcase ten Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences across Australia, from food and produce, seafood, food events, cafes and restaurants.

    Fifth in this ten month series is WAITOC Aboriginal tourism operator member, Barraddict Sport Fishing Charters.  Kurt Williamson is a fully qualified Indigenous guide who has grown up fishing throughout the Kimberley his whole life.  He’s been guiding for over 10 years putting numerous clients onto their fish of a life time. He’s been an addict since landing his first barra at the age of seven.

    One of the Kimberley's best kept secrets, Barraddict averages 285 days on the water along the spectacular coastline of the Kimberley.  His knowledge of the Derby and Kimberley region is extensive, including knowledge passed down from previous generations.  Fishing is a life passion for Kurt. 

    Owner of Barraddict Sport Fishing Charters, Kurt said “there’s something for everyone who comes out with me on tour.  From fishing to mud crabbing or both, there’s nothing better than to see the enjoyment and excitement on people’s faces when they catch their prized fish and tasty mud crabs.  We go out surrounded by stunning scenery and I’m able to take them to secret places that no-one else knows about. There’s nothing better than to hear how they’re going to cook up their seafood to enjoy with family and friends back home.   If they’re lucky I share my recipes with them…”

    Speaking of Barraddict Sport Fishing Charters, Simon Haigh, CEO of WAITOC said, "WAITOC's Aboriginal Gourmet Experience campaign is intended to highlight the unique food, drink and culture experiences that Aboriginal tourism operators have to offer in WA.  In recent times, we have seen the growing importance of culinary tourism as a way to immerse yourself in the culture of the destination that you're visiting.  The key attributes People, Produce and Place behind Tourism Australia's Restaurant Australia campaign provides a memorable experience for the tourists.  Culinary tourism is a great way to exchange culture and is growing in popularity.  Barraddict is a great example of an Aboriginal Gourmet Experience, using 'fresh' and local flavours to be experienced in one of the world's top destination for international visitors and by the sounds of it - more importantly a guaranteed catch!" 

     

    Media Contact 
    Mr Simon Haigh 
    CEO WAITOC 
    +61 (0)419 921 946

    Mr Kurt Williamson
    Barraddict Sport Fishing Charters
    +61 (0)407 911 348

     

     

  • WAITOC Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences in WA - Issue 4 - Kooljaman at Cape Leveque

    WAITOC Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences in WA - Issue 4 - Kooljaman at Cape Leveque

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    WAITOC announces Kooljaman at Cape Leveque as the fourth featured operator in a series of Aboriginal food and drink showcase experiences in WA  

    Western Australia Indigenous Tourism Operators Council’s (WAITOC) Chairman, Doc Reynolds is pleased to feature another member as part of the Aboriginal Gourmet Experience series for 2014 in line with the recent launch of Restaurant Australia by Tourism Australia inviting the world to dinner.

    Over the course of 2014, WAITOC will showcase ten Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences across Australia, from food and produce, seafood, food events, cafes and restaurants.

    Fourth in this ten month series is WAITOC Aboriginal tourism operator member, Kooljaman at Cape Leveque.  A multi-award winning tourism wilderness camp, Kooljaman at Cape Leveque is a unique camp on the tip of the Dampier Peninsula, 220 km north of Broome.  It is jointly owned by Djarindjin and One Arm Point Aboriginal communities.  Kooljaman’s new restaurant is surrounded by a spectacular coastline and stunning beaches providing a memorable experience. 

    Manager of the resort, Heather Davey said “Our guests can enjoy a diverse range of nature based experiences including gorgeous sunrises and sunsets, swimming in azure waters, whale watching and for the more adventurous mud crabbing, cultural tours and fishing.” Kooljaman’s new restaurant offers alfresco dining overlooking Western Beach with stunning views over the pindan cliffs and beautiful sunsets.  Kooljaman Chef Remy Dipasquale says “I’m very proud to be working with bush foods.  Our menu brings a unique style and flavour to the dining experience at Kooljaman and the Lemon Myrtle Wild Barramundi appears to be a hot favourite with guests”. www.kooljaman.com.au

    Speaking of Kooljaman at Cape Leveque, Simon Haigh, CEO of WAITOC said, “WAITOC’s Aboriginal Gourmet Experience campaign is intended to highlight the unique food, drink and culture experiences that Aboriginal tourism operators have to offer in WA. In recent times, we have seen the growing importance of culinary tourism as a way to immerse yourself in the culture of the destination that you’re visiting. The key attributes People, Produce and Place behind Tourism Australia’s Restaurant Australia campaign provides a memorable experience for the tourists. Culinary tourism is a great way to exchange cultures and is growing in popularity. Kooljaman is a great example of an Aboriginal Gourmet Experience, using ‘fresh’ and local flavours to be experienced in one of the world’s top destinations for international visitors."

    Media Contact
    Mr Simon Haigh
    CEO WAITOC
    +61 (0)419 921 946

    Mrs Heather Davey
    Manager - Kooljaman at Cape Leveque
    +618 9192 4970

     

  • WAITOC Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences in WA - Issue 3 - Uptuyu Aboriginal Adventures

    WAITOC Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences in WA - Issue 3 - Uptuyu Aboriginal Adventures

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    header splash

    WAITOC announces Neville Poelina from Uptuyu Aboriginal Adventures as the third featured operator in a series of Aboriginal food and drink showcase experiences in WA

    Western Australia Indigenous Tourism Operators Council’s (WAITOC) Chairman, Doc Reynolds is pleased to feature another member as part of the Aboriginal Gourmet Experience series for 2014.

    Over the course of 2014, WAITOC will showcase ten Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences across Australia, from food and produce, seafood, food events, cafes and restaurants.

    Third in this ten month series is WAITOC Aboriginal tourism operator member, Uptuyu Aboriginal Adventures. Based in the Kimberley in Australia's North West region Neville Poelina's speciality has always been about providing an authentic experience and allowing guests to truly experience an Aboriginal cultural approach to hunting and gathering bush foods. It's about having the flexibility to seize the moment and make the most of what is happening around you. Whether Neville is escorting you to catch and cook fresh water prawns, barramundi, bush fruits or seeds, you can be sure that you are sharing in the best that the country you are traveling in has to offer.

    Introducing his tour, Neville said “I have found that our guests have been totally impressed with being able to catch their own food. They love to see how it’s caught and processed and more importantly how delicious it tastes for something cooked so basically. This is not just about enjoying a meal together but expressing how our food is our medicine, prepared in the right way and eaten at the right time of the year shows that food is central to our culture. We have six seasons and only eat produce when it is at its best, we harvest only what is required, no more. Nature gives us the signs of what we should be eating and when, that is why we always eat the fat off the land.”. www.uptuyu.com.au

    Speaking of Uptuyu Aboriginal Adventures, Simon Haigh, CEO of WAITOC said, “WAITOC’s Aboriginal Gourmet Experience campaign is intended to highlight the unique food, drink and culture experiences that Aboriginal tourism operators have to offer in WA. In recent times, we have seen the growing importance of culinary tourism. The key attributes People, Produce and Place behind Tourism Australia’s forthcoming Restaurant Australia campaign provides a memorable experience for the tourists. Culinary tourism is a great way to exchange cultures and is growing in popularity. Neville’s tour is again a great example of an Aboriginal Gourmet Experience, using ‘fresh’ and local flavours to be experienced in one of the world’s top destinations for international visitors."

    Media Contact 
    Mr Simon Haigh 
    CEO WAITOC 
    +61 (0)419 921 946

    Mr Neville Poelina 
    +61 (0)400 878898

    Photo credit: James Fisher

  • WAITOC Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences in WA - Issue 2 - Wula Guda Nyinda Eco Adventures

    WAITOC Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences in WA - Issue 2 - Wula Guda Nyinda Eco Adventures

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    WAITOC announces Darren ‘Capes’ Capewell’ Wula Guda Nyinda Eco Adventures as the second featured operator in a series of Aboriginal food and drink showcase experiences in WA

    Western Australia Indigenous Tourism Operators Council’s (WAITOC) Chairman, Doc Reynolds is pleased to feature another member as part of the Aboriginal Gourmet Experience series for 2014.

    Over the course of 2014, WAITOC will showcase ten Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences across Australia, from food and produce, seafood, food events, cafes and restaurants.

    Second in this ten month series is WAITOC Aboriginal tourism operator member, Wula Guda Nyinda Eco Adventures

    Based in the Shark Bay World Heritage Area in the Coral Coast region, from ‘Red Sand Country’ to ‘White Sand Country’ to the beautiful and pristine ‘Blue Waters’, Capes introduces his new Catch & Cook Overnight 4WD Safari. This tour is for the ultimate adventurer and takes in the raw and untamed rugged Wild West Coast of Australia including Steep Point, South Passage, False Entrance and Zuytdorp Cliffs.

    Enjoy three days of exploring on a comfortable 4WD adventure, paddling across sheltered bays, landing on deserted beaches, swimming on magnificent coral reefs teeming with amazing marine life. Introducing his new tour, Capes said “After receiving many enquiries about this type of tour, we’ve developed this exciting tour where you can even catch and cook your own seafood on a campfire, camp on the beach and listen to the ancient sounds of the didgeridoo under a starlit sky.” www.wulaguda.com.au 

    Speaking of Wula Guda Nyinda Eco Adventures, Simon Haigh, CEO of WAITOC said, “WAITOC’s Aboriginal Gourmet Experience campaign is intended to highlight the unique food, drink and culture experiences that Aboriginal tourism operators have to offer in WA. The positioning behind Tourism Australia’s forthcoming Restaurant Australia campaign lies in three key attributes: People, Produce and Place. In summary it is about: Fresh thinking, Open Air and Our Flavours. Capes’ tour is another great example of an Aboriginal Gourmet Experience, using ‘fresh’ and original flavours to be experienced in one of the world’s heritage listed ‘open air’ locations”. 

    Media Contact
    Mr Simon Haigh – CEO WAITOC
    +61 (0)419 921 946

    Mr Darren ‘Capes’ Capewell
    +61 (0)429 708 847 / (0)432 029 436


  • WAITOC Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences in WA - Issue 1 - Koomal Dreaming

    WAITOC Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences in WA - Issue 1 - Koomal Dreaming

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    WAITOC announces Josh Whiteland from Koomal Dreaming as the first in a series of Aboriginal food and drink showcase experiences in WA.

    Western Australia Indigenous Tourism Operators Council’s (WAITOC) Chairman, Doc Reynolds is pleased to announce the launch of its Aboriginal Gourmet Experience operator in focus series for 2014. 

    Over the course of 2014, WAITOC will showcase ten Aboriginal Gourmet Experiences across Western Australia, from food and produce, seafood, food events, cafes and restaurants. This series of media releases coincides with Tourism WA’s ‘Invite the World to Dinner’ WA famil in October-November.

    First up in this ten month series is WAITOC Aboriginal tourism operator member, Koomal Dreaming. Based in Dunsborough in WA’s beautifully serene south west region, with Koomal Dreaming you will taste bush tucker, learn bush medicine and meet the animals, plants and Dreaming spirits that have enriched the lives of Wardandi and Bibbulman people since time began. Josh Whiteland, owner of Koomal Dreaming said, "I enjoy incorporating native foods into my tours which is something unique I can provide to my guests". There's no other way to experience the South West as Josh shows you the amazing bush tucker available in a first class setting. www.koomaldreaming.com.au 

    Speaking of Koomal Dreaming, Simon Haigh, CEO of WAITOC said, “WAITOC’s Aboriginal Gourmet Experience campaign is intended to highlight the unique food, drink and culture experiences that Aboriginal tourism operators have to offer in WA. The positioning behind Tourism Australia’s Restaurant Australia campaign lies in three key attributes: People, Produce and Place. In summary it is about: Fresh thinking, Open Air and Our Flavours. As such, Josh Whiteland's Koomal Dreaming is a great example of an Aboriginal Gourmet Experience, using 'fresh' and original flavours to be experienced in one of the world's best 'open air' locations". 

    Media Contact:
    Mr Simon Haigh – CEO, WAITOC
    +61 (0)419 921 946

    Mr Josh Whiteland - Koomal Dreaming
    +61 (0)413 843 426